It’s not clear when exactly English football lost its way philosophically and technically. Back in 1953, humiliation at the hands of the magnificent Magyars when Hungary destroyed England 6-3 at Wembley – was one major flash point. Sixteen years later, England won the World Cup on home soil without really distinguishing itself technically. That England team played very much in the English way – lots of hard tackling, hard running and determination. Nothing wrong with that but since 1966, those qualities alone have proved to be inferior to teams that had a better grasp of ball possession and the finer aspects of passing.

THE ENGLISH GAME

The England team mostly gathers its members from the English Football League and whatever brand of football it plays – forms the foundation of the England team’s approach. The “hit and  UFABET ผ่านมือถือ rush” mentality – the fast paced, hard tackling, hard running style of football – gained tremendous popularity in the English leagues as crowds fed off on its high energy, high excitement vibe. It is certainly exciting. But at the international level – that approach has been exposed as tactically naive. England teams attacked hard but often not in a “smart” way. Spain showed in the 2010 World Cup – how intelligent its football is – the way they probed for opponents’ weak spots and hit them where they were most vulnerable – often with a soft, adroit pass and great movement deep into the box. England teams in contrast – tended to want to force their way past opponents in a physical style – and with a long domestic season before major tournaments – that approach has often crashed and burned midway through the campaign.

The domestic game since the 1990s – has seen a greater focus on technically proficient football with the influx of foreign players. While its influence has been largely positive, their presence has often resulted in the exclusion of English players in the first team – especially in the EPL Big Six teams where the majority of first teamers are non-English. While training with top foreign players is good for English players – their lack of first team football has hindered their development and hence crippled the England team